Anatomy of a Scene: Battle of the Sexes

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I love the “Anatomy of a Scene” series at the New York Times, where filmmakers explain what went into creating a moment in a movie. Here, Valerie Dayton and Jonathan Faris talk about something most filmgoers never consciously notice, the “soundscape” and how that affects our sense of what is happening. I was very intrigued to hear their reference to AMSR because I actually thought of that when I was watching the film.

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Behind the Scenes Behind the Scenes Directors

Movie Accents — Erik Singer on Actors Playing Real People

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I am always fascinated by accents, in real life and in movies and I love to hear people who can switch from one to another. I was most recently very impressed with the Appalachian accents in “Logan Lucky,” especially Daniel Craig.

In this video from Wired, dialect/accent/linguistics expert Erik Singer talks about actors who take on one of the most difficult challenges of all, “ideolects,” not just a regional or class-related accent but the specific way a particular individual speaks, from Steve Jobs and Muhammad Ali to Ray Charles or Jacqueline Kennedy. We know the way these iconic figures sound. It takes a very talented and dedicated actor to get the details so right that we barely notice and can just focus on the performance.

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Actors Behind the Scenes Understanding Media and Pop Culture

But Did You Watch the Simpsons Version of Planet of the Apes?

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To no one’s surprise, the critically acclaimed “War for the Planet of the Apes” was a big hit at the box office in its opening weekend. Vulture was inspired by this last of the rebooted trilogy to revisit one of its offshoots, the musical version in a “Simpsons” episode.

The bit has so many disparate parts — ’80s Austrian-pop parody, old-school-musical homage, Planet of the Apes, break-dancing, old vaudeville-style jokes — but in the hands of The Simpsons and its writers, it works. Or as Bill Oakley, one of the two showrunners at the time, told Vulture, “ was just a magic visit from the joke fairy.”

One of my favorite details: “The person running the room had never seen it, yet was able to concoct a beloved parody of it just through pop-culture osmosis.”

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